Travel agency offer travel guide and cheap travel packages
Experience Rome: Villa Doria Pamphili
Rome's largest public landscaped park, the Villa Doria Pamphili, takes up an area of around 2 square kilometers. It was originally owned by the family that gave the park it's name, then bought by the City of Rome at the end of the twentieth century. It's a beautiful area that's known as one of the city's best bird watching sites and a great place for a walk or jog.

It's been around for a long time as a villa - before the 1630s, it was known as the Villa Veccia. Then it was purchased by Panfilo Panfili, who also purchased the neighboring vineyards.

This created an enormous holding that stood on high ground above the rest of Rome. It was known for its amazing views, and acted as a suburban resort for its owner and his family.

A new villa was begun later, in the 1640s, by the nephew of the then-Pope, Giovanni Battista Pamphili. It took until 1652 to be finished, with the villa itself designed to complement its ancient and contemporary artworks.

Most of these works of art today reside in the Capitoline Museum, though there are still some on site. Those who visit the villa will encounter a crowded Baroque style exterior, with alternating windows and statuary niches, as well as Mannerist bas relief panels.

Inside, you'll see frescoes depicting Roman history and even more Bas reliefs. Around the exterior there are gardens, first laid out around 1650 and creating a sequence of connected areas surrounding the villa and the lower levels. Statuary was once placed here, but much of this area is now grassed.

In the other garden areas, later fountains and gateways make this a beautiful but complex park. You can still hear sixteenth and seventeenth century music at the concerts that are still held in the Villa Doria Pamphili's Giardino del Teatro.

Most of the gardens around the Villa Doria Pamphili are currently planted in the way they might have been in the sixteenth century, featuring wide graveled walkways and closely cut greenery. At one point, a number of ancient Roman tombs were located on the site, but over the centuries, they've been excavated and their contents placed elsewhere.

You may be surprised to know that this lush and attractive park was once the site of violence. During the short lived Roman Republic in the middle of the ninteenth century, there was hand to hand fighting in the fortified villas on the outskirts of the city, and the Villa Doria Pamphili was closest to some of the worst combat. However, it survived intact while neighboring villas were destroyed almost completely.

After this occurred, the owner of the villa bought up these neighboring lands, expanding the villa's surrounding area further. Now neighboring structures are the site of art exhibitions. The villa itself is currently open to the public, and contains many of the antiquities and sculptures it housed when it was a residence.

If you're taking a holiday to Rome, don't forget to include a trip to this incredible Roman park. Every tourist should see the Villa Doria Pamphili.


 
< Prev   Next >

© 2014 Travel guide,travel advices and daily travel deals.